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ANIMALS CAN GET HARMED

Birds, fish and shellfish can mistake plastic for food or get caught in it.

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EACH YEAR

100,000 animals in the sea are killed by plastic.
One in three sea turtles, and around 90% of seabirds, have eaten it. 

 

THE PREDICTION

By 2050, the amount of plastic in the ocean
will weigh more than the amount of fish in the ocean.

Colored Garbage Can

MOST TYPES OF PLASTIC ARE IN FACT RECYCLABLE

but most municipal governments do not have the infrastructure in place to carry out this energy-intensive process. Recycling plastic not only requires large amounts of energy but also uses large quantities of water.

PRODUCTION PROCESS IS ONE OF THE LEADING CAUSES OF GLOBAL WARMING

While getting rid of plastic waste is one of the primary environmental problems, the production process is a leading cause of carbon emissions contributing to global warming. It takes a lot of energy and resources to make plastic, with more than 90% being produced from fossil fuel resources.

Source: grist.org

WATER IN BOTTLES TAKES 2000 X ENERGY THAN TAP WATER!

Experts believe that if current trends continue, in 30 years’ time 20% of global oil consumption and 15% of global carbon emissions will be associated with plastic production. Creating bottled water takes 2000 times the energy than it does to produce tap water! (Wonderopolis).

IT DOESN’T ROT LIKE PAPER OR FOOD!

The problem with plastic is that most of it isn’t biodegradable. It doesn’t rot, like paper or food, so instead it can hang around in the environment for hundreds of years. Each year, 400 million tonnes of plastic is produced and 40% of that is single-use – plastic we’ll only use once before it’s binned. More than eight million tonnes of plastic enters the world’s oceans each year and most of that escapes from land.

Biodegradability of Plastic Bottles

450 YEARS TO BIODEGRADE

Plastic waste is fast becoming a widely recognised problem. Plastic can take hundreds of years to biodegrade. It takes up valuable space in landfill sites and is polluting the natural environment, having a significant impact on our oceans. One of our biggest threats to our ocean, rivers and lakes!

GREAT PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCH

Current Situation with our Oceans
Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Once these plastics enter the gyre, they are unlikely to leave the area until they degrade into smaller microplastics under the effects of sun, waves and marine life. As more and more plastics are discarded into the environment, microplastic concentration in the will only continue to increase.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is the largest of the five offshore plastic accumulation zones in the world’s oceans.
It is located halfway between Hawaii and California.

TRY YOUR BEST TO AVOID: